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Image of the Month

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This latest featured image utilises the histology services within the Image Resource Facility (IRF) and shows an axial section through the human eye socket.

It is embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned at 0.3mm with a slow-speed diamond-blade saw and stained using Millers elastin and counterstained using picro-sirius red.

The anterior ethmoidal artery is shown traversing the medial orbital wall, through the anterior ethmoidal foramen. This work is being carried out by Mohammad Sharif, a third-year Biomedical Science student, working in Mr Philip Adds Anatomy laboratory within the Institute of Medical and Biomedical Education.

Mohammad’s project is ‘3-D mapping of the blood supply to the medial wall of the orbit’. The medial wall of the orbit is mainly composed of the thin papyraceous ethmoidal orbital plate. It contains contributions from the ethmoid, lacrimal & maxilla. Near the junction of the medial wall with the roof lie the anterior and posterior ethmoidal foramen, through which pass the anterior & posterior ethmoidal nerve and arteries respectively. These arteries are branches of the ophthalmic artery, a branch of the internal carotid artery.

The section shown here is a beautiful example of the artery crossing the medial wall. Not only that, it also shows the foramen opening, to allow this connection to happen.

As a St George’s core facility the IRF histological and microscopy sample preparation resources are available to all students and researchers and outside collaborations to perform projects The sample preparation laboratory is equipped for specialised histology techniques, resin and wax embedding processing and various microtomes for semi and ultra-thin sectioning as well as specific electron microscopy sample preparation techniques.

The IRF also provides hands-on training with expert scientific and technical support. More information can be found at the IRF website

 

This latest featured image utilises the histology services within the Image Resource Facility (IRF) and shows an axial section through the human eye socket.

It is embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned at 0.3mm with a slow-speed diamond-blade saw and stained using Millers elastin and counterstained using picro-sirius red.

The anterior ethmoidal artery is shown traversing the medial orbital wall, through the anterior ethmoidal foramen. This work is being carried out by Mohammad Sharif, a third-year Biomedical Science student, working in Mr Philip Adds Anatomy laboratory within the Institute of Medical and Biomedical Education.

Mohammad’s project is ‘3-D mapping of the blood supply to the medial wall of the orbit’. The medial wall of the orbit is mainly composed of the thin papyraceous ethmoidal orbital plate. It contains contributions from the ethmoid, lacrimal & maxilla. Near the junction of the medial wall with the roof lie the anterior and posterior ethmoidal foramen, through which pass the anterior & posterior ethmoidal nerve and arteries respectively. These arteries are branches of the ophthalmic artery, a branch of the internal carotid artery.

The section shown here is a beautiful example of the artery crossing the medial wall. Not only that, it also shows the foramen opening, to allow this connection to happen.

As a St George’s core facility the IRF histological and microscopy sample preparation resources are available to all students and researchers and outside collaborations to perform projects The sample preparation laboratory is equipped for specialised histology techniques, resin and wax embedding processing and various microtomes for semi and ultra-thin sectioning as well as specific electron microscopy sample preparation techniques.

The IRF also provides hands-on training with expert scientific and technical support. More information can be found at the IRF website

 

 

Image of the Month - December 2014

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Jarama Clucas- Final year PhD Student working in Dr Ferran Valderrama’s laboratory in the Molecular cell Sciences Research Centre

The title of my project and our interest is ‘The Role of Radixin in Prostate Cancer Progression’

The image above shows the highly tumourigenic prostate cancer cell line, WPE-1 NB26 in a 3D cell culture model. This cell line was derived from the non-neoplastic cell line RWPE-1 which was treated with MNU, a carcinogen, and selected out for its invasive ability in mice. This makes this cell line useful for studying prostate cancer progression.

WPE-1 NB26 cells were seeded in a droplet to create a spheroid using the Hanging Drop Assay. After these cells formed a spheroid 24hrs later, they were embedded into a 3D matrix extracted from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma in mice, commercially known as Matrigel, and cultured for 8 days. After 8 days, the spheroids were fixed and co-stained for immunofluorescence with DAPI (Blue) to visualise the nucleus, E-cadherin (Green) for cell-cell contacts and Laminin V (Red) for structure polarity, any co-localisation between E-cadherin and Laminin V is seen in yellow. This shows that WPE-1 NB26 can form a structure similar to that of RWPE-1 with a hollow lumen although the overall structure is disorganised in comparison. We aim to investigate whether radixin, a cytoskeletal linker recently implicated in cancer progression, contributes to this disorganised structure. This image was taken using the Zeiss Confocal LSM 510 at objective 20x, and is approximately 50% up from the base of the structure.

 

Image of the Month
 
The Image Resource Facility (IRF) will be showing an “Image of the Month” in our website to profile biomedical research involving imaging at St George’s. We are delighted to introduce our first image produced by Miss Lu Wang - an MRes in Biomedical Science student working in Dr Elena Sviderskaya’s lab (Molecular Cell Sciences Research Centre). Miss Wang’s research focuses on “Neuronal differentiation in immortal neural crest-like stem cells”


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Immortal neural crest-like stem cells express markers of Neuronal differentiation. These stem cells were derived from neonatal mouse epidermis (Sviderskaya et al., FASEB J, 2009) that have been also shown to differentiate into functional sensory neurons, Schwann precursor cells, pigmented melanocytes, chondrocytes and smooth muscle cells. Neuronal differentiation was induced by addition of a cocktail of neurotrophic factors and confirmed by immunostaining using an antibody against neuron-specific tubulin β-III (green). Cells were co-stained with DAPI (blue) to visualize the cell nuclei. The image was taken using a Zeiss Axiovert 200M Inverted epi-fluorescent microscope.
 

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